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Help Customers Avoid Soil Erosion and Runoff

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Help Customers Avoid Soil Erosion and Runoff

When preparing a landscape for the cooler seasons, be proactive for potential soil erosion and runoff that is likely to occur.

Help Customers Avoid Runoff

Soil erosion and runoff might not occur as frequently as other landscaping issues, but it can be costly to repair for the customer and for the environment. It’s better to be proactive than reactive. Soil erosion is the transfer of soil from one place to another caused by wind, water and other natural agents. Stormwater systems in the area can become clogged when soil from unprepared properties run into the street and it can lead to other environmental issues.

Avoid Soil Erosion

By taking a few simple, proactive steps, you can help keep your customer’s yard pristine and avoid soil erosion and runoff.

Prevent soil erosion with shrubs and grasses

One of the best ways to prevent soil erosion is by using ground covers and having a healthy, strong root zone. Bare and exposed soil is vulnerable to erosion, so finding an appropriate covering method will help preserve the soil structure.

prevent soil erosion with plants

Analyze the customer’s yard before deciding on a plan for directing the runoff. For landscapes that don’t have steep slopes present, simply adding in shrubs and grasses can help defer soil erosion by collecting snowmelt or rainwater.

control soil erosion

Native grasses will help the soil have better stability because they produce long roots that can connect the topsoil and subsoil. Shrubs and flowers can be very effective in preventing erosion and adding beautiful focal points to the landscape.

Using terracing and retaining walls to stop runoff

For customers with steep slopes, consider adding retaining walls or terraces to the landscapes layout. These will help prevent loss of soil nutrients and erosion, and they also can add a bit of texture, depth and dimension to the landscape.

Terracing is a control method for steep slopes that consists of a staircase pattern to break up the slop into sections. The structure can be created with stones, bricks or even vegetation like prairie grasses.

Retaining walls are used to overcome sloped areas and often have visual interest as well as a functional purpose. Retaining walls protect areas from saturation and soil erosion reduction. Here are a few types of retaining walls that can be incorporated into the landscape.

  1. Gravity walls: These hold the earth by the weight of the wall’s material. They can be formal pavers or even a stack of large rocks, but they can fall easily and should be used for short slopes of 3 feet or less.
  2. Anchored walls: These are the strongest type and can be combined with other techniques. An anchor is wrapped around the wall, and a base is placed deeper into the hill, which provides the stabilization.
  3. Piling walls: These use long piles, or poles, that go deep into the soil and above it. Pilings can be made of metal or treated lumber, and they have a good capacity to hold the soil back.
  4. Cantilever walls: These are similar to piling walls however, they get added strength from a sort of “arm” that extends back into the hill. This can increase its capacity to stabilize pressure.

Managing and directing rainfall and excess water

Rainwater runoff from a building, house, or down a slope can greatly impact soil erosion on your customer’s property. Here are so options to propose to your client.

  1. Rain collection barrels
  2. French drains
  3. Berms
  4. Dry well
  5. Swale

Be sure to check what is permitted for the area and follow all rules and regulations.

Fall Is The Best Time To Improve The Soil

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Fall is the best time to improve the soil for next year’s growing season. By adding a proper soil amendment to your client’s yard in the fall, the yard will have all winter to restore the soil’s biology and nutrients. Before you can improve your client’s soil, determine what the soil needs and use products that can replenish it.

Start by testing the soil

Test the soil to know how to improve the soil.

Testing the soil is the first step you need to take in order to improve the soil. Without a soil test, you are often walking in blind as to what your client’s property needs. Assuming all soil in the area is the same can result in using the incorrect fertilizer or amount of soil amendment.

Be sure to take multiple samples from the property. Separate samples should come from areas that differ in texture, color and previous applications of fertilizers, organic amendments, and lime.

Adjust the pH level to improve the soil

The soil’s pH level is important because a majority of the necessary plant nutrients are soluble at levels of 6.5 to 6.8. When the levels are too low or too high, plants can suffer from the soil problems and develop diseases.

Mirimichi Green’s CarbonizPN Soil Enhancer is the ideal soil amendment for any soil pH problem. The product is a pH optimizer – it is able to lower the pH if it is too high or raise the pH if it is too low.

Add organic material to improve the soil

Organic materials are all ideal to add in the fall as they help provide food for soil microbes and protect the soil from being bare during the winter.

Compost is a good material to consider adding as it helps nourish microbes. Compost easily gets worked into the soil over time in the fall and winter thanks to the rainy or snowy weather. Additionally, spring-applied compost can attract a number of pests. Luckily, Mirimichi Green’s CarbonizPN is 50% compost and 50% biochar, so not only will adjust the pH, but it will also provide organic material to the soil.

Tell us how you improve soil for your customers during the fall using the hashtag #MirimichiGreen on Instagram or Twitter.

Post-Hurricane Harvey Insecticide Aerial Spray

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Clean up efforts and support after Hurricane Harvey are underway including monetary donations, food, water, volunteering, etc. With the excessive amount of sitting water in the Houston area, there is a growing concern about the growth of pest insect populations, such as mosquitoes. Now, a post-Hurricane Harvey chemical insecticide aerial spray application is underway. The Pentagon announced that it has dispatched C-130H Sprayers from the Air Force Reserve’s 910th Airlift Wing in order to “assist with recovery efforts in eastern Texas,” by spraying the insecticide, Naled. The aircrafts are set to spray a chemical insecticide in order to help control pest insect populations. The pest populations pose a health risk to rescue workers and residents of Houston.

Post-Hurricane Harvey Insecticide Aerial Spray

The aircrafts will spray more than 6 million acres throughout the Houston, Texas area. The Air Force stated this effort is expected to surpass any previous aerial spraying applications. The Pentagon’s choice of insecticide could do more harm than good for Texas citizens. The Air Force reported the mosquito control aerial spray protocol involves spraying the “Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved and regulated material, Naled,” which the Air Force says will not be used in amounts large enough to “cause any concern for human health.” However, the insecticide Naled, is currently banned in the European Union due to the “unacceptable risk” it presents to human health and safety.

Post-Hurricane Harvey Pesticide Aerial Spray

Chemical Insecticides Come with Side Effects

Although Naled is an “EPA approved” insecticide, the EPA is re-evaluating the product and its safety. The EPA’s website states, “the EPA expects to issue new human health and ecological risk assessments for Naled before the end of 2017.” Scientists and many alarmed citizens have stated that Naled will surely be banned soon as the EPA has found it to harm 22 out of 28 endangered species exposed to it.

Naled insecticide has harmful side effects

Naled is a known neurotoxin in animals and humans, as it inhibits acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme essential to nerve function and communication, and has even been known to have caused paralysis. Scientific evidence, including a recent Harvard study, has pointed to Naled’s responsibility for the mass killing of North American bees. After only one day of Naled being sprayed in South Carolina last year, more than 2.5 million bees died.

Naled’s manufacturer, Sumimoto Chemical Corp., is also the manufacturer of SumiLarv.  SumiLarv is a product that is now believed to have been the cause of the spike in birth defects in Brazil that was originally blamed on the Zika virus. The most concerning consequence Naled poses for human health is the chemical’s ability to harm pregnant women and fetuses. Side effects include smaller brain sizes of newborns, having a child born with an autism-spectrum disorder and other symptoms like dizziness and nausea.

Alternative to Chemical Insecticide and Pesticide Products

With the extreme side effects that are possible by using harsh chemical products, Mirimichi Green urges landscapers, homeowners, and others that are seeking a pesticide or insecticide to use natural and safe products.

There will be a safe alternative for insecticide spray applications after natural disasters occur. Mirimichi Green will be launching a 100% natural and safe pesticide – Mirimichi Green Pest Control. A common stereotype of natural products is the natural products don’t work as well as chemical products. Mirimichi Green’s Pest Control has been tested by the World Health Organization, exhibiting an 80% kill rate efficacy report for pests and larvae upon contact. Products don’t have to be chemically based to be effective.

The soon-to-come pesticide works on mosquitoes, fleas, ants, roaches, no-see-ums, chiggers, spiders, mites, whitefly, aphids, plus many more insects. Mirimichi Green’s Pest Control is safe to spray around people, pets, and plants and has an immediate re-entry time after the spray has settled, making it ideal for any outdoor space.

Top 8 Plants That Repel Bugs and Mosquitoes

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Pesky bugs and mosquitoes can ruin any outdoor experience and cause harm to a landscape. Here are the top 8 plants that repel bugs and mosquitoes that you can recommend to your customers struggling with insect infestations.

1.) Citronella Grass

Citronella grass can repel bugs and mosquitoes

Citronella is known for its oil being used in patio candles. Citronella grass is a better option than candles because it doesn’t burn out. True citronella plants, Cymbopogon nardus or Cymbopogon winterianus, are grasses. Often times there is citronella scented geranium being advertised as Citronella grass, so don’t be fooled.

2.) Petunias

Petunias can repel bugs and mosquitoes

This perennial is sometimes referred to as “nature’s pesticide,” because it can repel aphids, tomato hornworm, asparagus beetles, leafhoppers, and squash bugs. It’s recommended to buy transplants and place them in light, well-drained soil in full sun after the last spring frost.

3.) Lavender

Lavender can repel bugs and mosquitoes

Lavender is a fragrant plant and luckily its smell deters mosquitoes. Plus its purple blooms add a nice pop of color to any landscape. It likes to be hot and dry, so it’s perfect for summer.

4.) Nasturtium

Nasturtium can repel bugs and mosquitoes

Nasturtium repels whiteflies, squash bugs, aphids, several beetles, and cabbage loopers. This one will help other plants in your garden, too. It produces an airborne chemical that repels insects, protecting not only themselves but other plants in the grouping. Plant in early spring in moist, well-drained soil in full sun. They should be regularly watered and deadheaded to promote blooming.

5.) Rosemary

Rosemary can repel bugs and mosquitoes

Not only can this plant be used in the kitchen but it can help keep the bugs away. This is another plant perfect for summer heat because it likes to be dry. Mosquitoes are deterred by the smell of Rosemary. It can be planted it in containers, but it also works well as a hedge.

6.) Basil

Basil can repel bugs and mosquitoes

Basil is an annual herb and repels houseflies and mosquitoes.  This plant needs six to eight hours of full sun daily, and its soil should be moist and well-drained. This versatile herb can also treat mosquito bites.

7.) Lemongrass

Lemongrass can repel bugs and mosquitoes

Lemongrass is closely related to citronella and repels mosquitoes, but unlike the latter, it’s edible and is commonly used in Southeast Asian cooking. It can grow 3 to 5 feet tall and adds lots of extra height and texture to the landscape. Avoid planting lemongrass in clay soil. This tropical plant craves moisture but is quickly killed by heavy soil that makes water puddle.

8.) Mint

Mint can repel bugs and mosquitoes

Refreshing mint can be used in dishes and cocktails, but it has an added bonus. It’s a perennial that can repel bugs and mosquitoes. It’s recommended to grow mint in a pot in order to control the plant.

Tell us which of the Top 8 Plants That Repel Bugs and Mosquitoes your customers prefer using the hashtag #MirimichiGreen on Instagram or Twitter.

Top 6 Ornamentals To Include In Fall Landscapes

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Top 6 Ornamentals To Include In Fall Landscapes

Plants, shrubs, and flowers aren’t the only options for fall landscapes. Fall ornamental grasses add more personality and uniqueness to any landscape. Some ornamentals can survive well into the warmer seasons, so customers will be able to appreciate them even longer. Take a look at the top 6 ornamentals to include in fall landscapes that your customers are sure to enjoy this season.

1. Overdam Feather Reed Grass

Overdam Feather Reed Grass is a tall, red-brown, feathery summer plumes turns gold in the fall. It is sterile, which means it won’t produce unwanted seedlings. It creates a striking vertical effect in the fall landscape. Overdam Feather Reed Grass can grow up to 2 feet tall and 2 feet wide, and its flower stalks can grow up to 6 feet tall. It thrives in full sun and dry northern climates.

2. Heavy Metal Blue Switch Grass

This grass is a carefree native that’s perfect for a wild garden or meadow. Along with brilliant foliage, this grass is distinguished by metallic-blue blades that are topped by pink-tinted panicles. It serves as a great food source for birds in the winter, and it can grow up to 3 feet tall and wide. Plus, it withstands seasonal flooding, yet drought tolerant when established. Heavy Metal Blue Switch Grass prefers full to partial sun.

3. Pheasant’s Tail Grass

Also known as New Zealand Wind Grass, this ornamental grass is an evergreen with a fountain-like growth. The thread-like leaves turn copper, gold and bronze in the fall adding color to the landscape. It can tolerate heavy clay soils and is drought and deer tolerant. It grows to be around 2 to 3 feet tall and wide. Pheasant’s Tail Grass prefers full to partial sun.

4. Blonde Ambition Blue Grama Grass

Growing up to 3 feet tall and wide, this rugged, cold hardy native grass features blue-green foliage and striking, flag-like summer flowers on stiff, weather resistant stems. Blonde Ambition Blue Grama Grass provides cool-season interest, as the long lasting blonde seed heads remain through winter. Tolerant of many soil types, this is a perfect choice for low maintenance landscapes. It prefers full to partial sun.

5. Blue Heaven Little Bluestem

Blue Heaven Little Bluestem offers narrow, upright foliage that is a great vertical accent. While it may emerge blue, it will develop burgundy and pink hues in late summer. It will turn a rich copper in the fall and the stems develop purplish panicles and tan seed heads. It can reach 3 to 4 feet high and 2 to 3 feet wide. Blue Heaven Little Bluestem prefers full sun.

6. Regal Mist Pink Muhly Grass

This ornamental grass is small and features deep pink flowers that bloom from late summer to fall. When planted in masses it helps to soften a landscape and blur edges. It can be mixed into the landscape or set apart in containers. It grows 4 feet tall and wide. Regal Mist Pink Muhly Grass prefers partial to full sun.

Be sure to include Mirimichi Green products in all of your installs to ensure healthy plantings.

Shannon Easter To Speak At 2017 Distinguished Ideas Summit

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Boca West Country Club and The Polo Club of Boca Raton are hosting the 2017 Distinguished Ideas Summit for the General Managers, Board Members and Leadership Staff of currently-awarded Distinguished Clubs on October 1st, 2017.

Boardroom Magazine developed the Distinguished Clubs award program to help vitalize and preserve the institution of private clubs by fostering a ceaseless drive to ever improve the “Member Experience” provided by private clubs throughout the world. A club will become nominated and certain factors about the clubs are evaluated in order to determine award winners.

Pre-selected speakers for the Distinguished Ideas Summit will discuss how they created a great member experience at their own clubs by implementing unique ideas and strategies. Shannon Easter, Director of Golf Maintenance and Environmental Consultant at Broken Sound Golf Club, is scheduled to speak about how incorporating Mirimichi Green products helped lead to the recognition the club has received for its sustainable efforts.

Shannon Easter will specifically detail how he is using CarbonizPN Soil Enhancer to develop a carbon filter in the soil profile. “Building a true carbon filter often brings up a lot of questions. It is no different than the idea of using a carbon filter to filter a house or air-conditioning unit. Why wouldn’t you do the same thing in the soil profile? Plus, it has a positive impact on the environment – it decreases our water usage, decreases the electricity I use for my pump houses, increases my fertility, keeps the plant healthier and we are using fewer fungicides,” said Easter.

Easter was the guest speaker on Turf’s Up Radio on Saturday, August 27th, 2017. He revealed that his course is “coming in under budget and opening 8 weeks early” due to hard work and success with Mirimichi Green’s CarbonizPN and liquid fertilizers. “We are able to profit about half a million dollars by spending around 10% more on the initial planting of the golf course,” said Shannon. He is able to cut down his maintenance, irrigation and avoid paying for members to play elsewhere. Shannon Easter’s newly renovated course, The Club Course, will be opening in November 2017, 2 months before the originally scheduled date of January 1st, 2018. Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Easter will also speak about Broken Sound Club’s program that focuses on water conservation, water quality, energy conservation, pollution prevention, waste management, wildlife habitat conservation and enhancement, as well as, their efforts to educate the community on sustainable practices.

Be sure to check back in for an update after the 2017 Distinguished Clubs Ideas Summit for more details on Shannon Easter’s speech.

6 Factors To Keep In Mind About Artificial Turf Fields

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Artificial turf fields have been gaining popularity for being low maintenance and eco-friendly because it doesn’t need to be watered, fertilized, or mowed. Is it truly beneficial and environmentally friendly to put down synthetic turf? Let’s explore 6 factors to consider about this field installation.

 

1. Maintenance for artificial turf fields

It is incorrect to think that synthetic fields require less maintenance than natural turf grass or to say that these fields are maintenance free. Artificial turf grass fields require:

  1. Additional infill
  2. Irrigation because of high temperatures on hot days
  3. Chemical disinfectants
  4. Sprays to reduce static cling and odors
  5. Drainage repair and maintenance
  6. Erasing and repainting temporary lines
  7. Removing debris accumulation

maintenance of artificial turf fields

2. Costs start to add up

Long-term costs are less with natural turf fields compared to artificial turf fields. Artificial fields need replacing every 8-10 years, whereas a natural turf field requires consistent maintenance and occasional replacing. When artificial turf needs renovating every 8-10 years, there is a hidden cost of disposal of materials. Since the fields are filled with a ground-up rubber material, the material may require special disposal which could be costly.

Costs start to add up

3. Players prefer natural turf

A recent survey of 1,511 active NFL players by the NFL Players Association found:

  • 73% of the players preferred playing on natural turf grass field
  • 18% preferred artificial turf
  • 9% of the players had no preference

Players prefer natural turf

4. Player injuries are a concern

There is little to no research comparing injuries incurred on new artificial turf fields vs. natural turf fields. Some data indicates that the traditional artificial turf fields increased athlete injury, primarily due to increased surface hardness. NFL players were asked in a 2006 survey “Which surface do you think causes more soreness and fatigue to play on?”

  • 74% felt that artificial turf systems were more responsible for fatigue
  • 21% felt they were the same
  • 5% felt like natural grass systems increased fatigue
  • The most common comment was in the open survey section was “make all fields grass to prevent injuries.”

5. Potential infections increase

The potential for increased spread of infections among players has been under close inspection when it comes to artificial turf complexes. In a report titled “Texas Football Succumbs to Virulent Staph Infection From Turf”, at least 276 football players were reported to be infected with an antibiotic-resistant staph infection. These infections were primarily associated with increased skin abrasions stemming from artificial turf.

Potential Infections Increase

6. High temperatures are an issue

Artificial fields cannot be played on all the time due to the higher temperature on summer days.  The surface temperatures of artificial fields have been documented as high as 199°F on a day with an air temperature of 98°F. Researchers at Brigham Young University reported that “the surface temperature of a synthetic football field on campus averaged 117°F, with a daily high of 157°F. On an adjacent natural turf field, the surface temperature averaged 78°F, with a daily high of 89°F.” Artificial turf fields can be cooled down with irrigation but it is only a short-term fix. The only permanent fix for this issue is having the field be in an indoor facility. Because of these high temperatures, an artificial field will remain largely unusable during warm days. Additionally, practicing on an artificial field could increase the incidence of heat stroke, muscle cramping, and overall athlete fatigue.

Keep these 6 factors in mind when considering an installation of an artificial turf field.

The Top Problems And Solutions For Soil Compaction

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Turf Symptoms Of Soil Compaction

Here are 5 signs to look for to determine potential soil compaction. If any of the symptoms are occurring there is a good chance the soil is compacted and needs attention and immediate maintenance.

Turf Symptoms Of Soil Compaction

  1. Shallow, thicker and shorter roots
  2. Smaller and fewer leafs/blades
  3. Thin patches
  4. Lacks green color
  5. Overrun by weeds (e.g., knotweed, crabgrass, annual bluegrass, goosegrass, clover)

Tips for Preventing and Correcting Soil Compaction

Incorporating any of the 3 tips below into a turf maintenance program can help reduce soil compaction.

Reduce and direct traffic:

Tips for Preventing and Correcting Soil Compaction

  • Reduce traffic by the establishing pathways of concrete, pavers, gravel or dirt.
  • Minimize traffic when the soil is wet or near field capacity.

Take the extra necessary steps:

  • Use maintenance vehicles with pneumatic tires.
  • Change up the mowing patterns to reduce mower use on the same route.
  • Increase the height of the cut to increase wearability and root depth.
  • On golf courses, build large greens in order to frequently rotate cup placement.
  • On sports fields, occasionally move around the field boundaries.

Modify the soil:

The Top Problems And Solutions For Soil Compaction

  • Develop a soil medium that is more resistant to compaction with sand or loamy soils.
    • Note that the addition of sand to clay soils may actually increase their compatibility and destroy soil structure due to the development of cementing conditions. 
  • Add organic soil amendments such as Mirimichi Green’s CarbonizPN Soil Enhancer to decrease compactibility of the soil. (However, it is not a long-term fix and requires additional amending.)
  • Incorporate one or more cultivation practices (e.g., coring, grooving, slicing, or spiking) into the turf maintenance practices. 

There is no single practice or product that can solely correct compaction problems and several must be combined for a successful maintenance program. The top solution for soil compaction is combating compaction before it has developed into a problem.

Give these tips a try and let us know what works best for you.

Dog Spots Destroying Your Grass? Here’s What to Do.

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Having dogs has many perks, however, a lush, green lawn is not usually one of them. Unsightly brown spots in the lawn can appear after a dog relieves its bladder.

What causes dog brown spots?

These spots are caused by high levels of Nitrogen and not “acid” in dog urine as is commonly believed. Excess nitrogen in the waste is normal and due to proteins being broken down during digestion. Dog diets are usually high in protein so there will be high levels of Nitrogen. Small amounts of Nitrogen are good, but too much will kill patches of lawn.

According to the American Pet Products Association, 62% of US households have a dog. That equates to a lot of brown spots being formed on lawns across the country!

What can be done about dog spots in the grass?

Below are 4 tips for keeping the lawn looking healthy and green and preventing those brown spots:

1) Immediately Dilute The Spot

Watering the spot immediately after the dog has done its business will help dilute the Nitrogen. Running the hose for 10 seconds over the spot will help lessen the probability of the Nitrogen killing the lawn. Also, encouraging dogs to drink more water will internally dilute the Nitrogen. However, this technique will cause more trips outside.

Running the hose for 10 seconds over the spot will help lessen the probability of the Nitrogen killing the lawn. Also, encouraging dogs to drink more water will internally dilute the Nitrogen. However, this technique can also cause more trips outside.

2) Build A Designated Area

Construct a non-grassy designated area.

For example, a pine straw, mulched, or leafy area in the yard makes it pee-proof. Training the dog to use that area to potty may take a little time, but it is totally possible. Leading the dog to that area when it’s time to go will create a habit and a little positive reinforcement will encourage the dog to use the designated area. A homeowner can make these areas visually appealing to humans by placing potted hostas, ferns, or other greenery around the area.

3) Plant the Right Grass ( Grass Selection is Key)

Having the right kind of grass may also contribute to how easily and frequently these brown spots show up.

  • Fescue and Ryegrass are the most resistant to Nitrogen due to the genetic makeup of the roots.
  • Bermuda and Kentucky bluegrass do need nitrogen to thrive but are very sensitive to the time of year that they get fertilized. Unless the dog is only allowed to go outside during the spring and summer, these types of grass are very sensitive to Nitrogen and susceptible to brown spots.

4) Consider Fertilizing Less

If the lawn is suffering from brown spots, try reducing your fertilizer input.

Even small amounts of fertilizer may contain enough Nitrogen to kill the lawn in combination with the dog’s contribution. If you think your lawn needs a boost, try using a soil enhancer or soil amendment instead.

Give these tips a try and let us know what works best for you.

How to make the best choice between sod, seed or hydroseed

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Renovating any landscape or development area can often lead to many tough decisions – how to make the best choice between sod, seed or hydroseed is usually one of them. Below is a breakdown a few things to take into consideration because each project has different factors that come into play.

What is the budget?

There are price gaps depending on the size of the job and equipment/material prices and availability. Typically, sod is the most expensive option, costing customers between $6,000 and $10,000 for about an acre, due to high material and labor costs. The middle-ground option is hydroseed, and depending on the mix of the materials, it can cost a customer about $2,500 to $6,500 an acre. The application isn’t as labor intensive, but additional costs like finding skilled or licensed hydroseed technicians can cause the price to be higher. Also, hydroseeding usually isn’t an option for small jobs. Seed is typically cheapest, costing a customer from $1,000 to $5,000 per acre.

What tools are available?

Access to the proper tools is another major factor. Do you own or would you need to rent the equipment for the various installation methods? If you’re laying sod by hand, transporting sod pallets requires a skid-steer. Laying large rolls of sod mechanically is often the most efficient method, though it requires a “big roll” attachment on a tractor or skid-steer. Hydroseeding requires specific, heavy-duty equipment, including a retrofitted truck and a skilled crew to operate the equipment. Most companies revert to renting it or subcontracting the service. Seeding requires the least equipment and skill—a small push spreader can work depending on the size of the property or specialized equipment like a slit seeder may be beneficial for larger projects.

How quickly do you want to see results?

Contractors call sod “instant green” because it looks great the day it’s laid and provides instant gratification. Its fast-fix nature makes it perfect for commercial customers, like campus or property managers, with money to spend. But, sod requires upkeep and a good irrigation system or else the sod will die quickly. Seed can take four to five weeks before it begins to sprout. Many contractors prefer seed for longevity, suggesting it for homeowners who are less concerned with immediacy and want lasting results. Hydroseed typically takes as long to sprout as seed, however, its quick, efficient application is fit for large-scale properties, like fields or roadside turf, but it may be overkill in a backyard.

Vital components for success

Regardless of the installation method, the soil and water determine the success of a property. Prior to planting, it’s important to do a soil test. Lack of quality soil is often a detriment to new homes’ lawns or any property that has had issues with growing grasses. The test reveals what nutrients are lacking in the soil profile. While applying fertilizers may provide a temporary fix, it is important to get organics back into the soil. Here is a product line that can ensure healthy soil.

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